Category Archives: Uncategorized

Guest Post: ‘1215 and all that’ by Nicky Moxey, author of Sheriff and Priest

I thoroughly enjoyed writing this post! Thanks to Cathy for the opportunity.

What Cathy Read Next...

I’m delighted to welcome Nicky Moxey to What Cathy Read Next today.  A review copy of Nicky’s historical novel, Sheriff and Priest, is sitting in my author review pile.  Unfortunately, it may be there for some time so, in the meantime, I’m thrilled to bring you a guest post from Nicky about the turbulent events of King John’s reign.  It’s also an insight into her research for the sequel to Sheriff and Priest, due out in 2019.

Follow my blog with Bloglovin


Pageflex Persona [document: PRS0000032_00032]About the Book

Wimer could have become a monk. Instead, his decision to become a Chaplain – to make his way in the wider world of men – has put his soul in mortal danger.

In 12th Century East Anglia, poor Saxon boys stay poor. It takes an exceptional one to win Henry II’s friendship, and to rise to the job of High Sheriff of all Norfolk…

View original post 1,509 more words

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Updated cover :)

I just wanted to share this pretty new cover my lovely artist daughter has done for me, adding the awards that Wimer has won 🙂

Pageflex Persona [document: PRS0000032_00032]

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Papal Nuncios

The appointment of Papal legates (or Nuncios) in the early years of the 13thC makes fascinating reading.

I’m currently enjoying learning about Pandulf Verraccio, who was the legate who personally presented King John with his sentence of excommunication in 1211 – THAT must have been an interesting audience! He was also the man to whom King John surrendered his kingdom in 1213, and was also present at Runymede for the signing of the Magna Carta.

He appears to have had an on/off relationship with Pope Innocent, being recalled from office several times… In one of the down times, he was granted the Bishopric of Norwich, which brings him into contact with Dodnash Priory. How could a Roman bishop understand the subtleties of local practice? This quote from the 1188 Dodnash Priory charters is going to trip him up…

“Any dispute will be settled by the common council of the churches of the Aldergrove and Battle and the incumbent of East Bergholt, and if this should fail, by the arbitration of the Bishop of Norwich, without recourse to any superior judge.”

I feel a road trip to Battle coming up…

2 Comments

Filed under Uncategorized

To Lie for Truth’s Sake: The Novelist’s Conundrum

The best writing advice I’ve read for a long time!

A Writer's Path

by Richard Risemberg

The job of a fiction writer is to lie. Still, if it were only to lie, you could dedicate yourself to advertising or politics instead and accept troubled sleep as the price for prosperity. But a fiction writer must lie to show truth, and that’s not as easy as it sounds.

View original post 762 more words

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Book Quote Corner – Sheriff and Priest

I adore Norwich Cathedral. Does it show? 😀 But I’m sure Wimer did too.

A Writer's Path

View original post 153 more words

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Discovered Diamond!

I’ve just got THE most exciting news – Sheriff and Priest will have a Discovered Diamond review published on the 16th March! How fab is that!

DiscoveredDiamond

1 Comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Advent Calendar of Medieval Religious Institutions December 6th: Lanercost Priory

I have a huge soft spot for Lanercost Priory; my house is named after it! And I didn’t know it was Augustinian – Wimer’s order! Thanks to Historical Ragbag for a very interesting read.

Historical Ragbag

Lanercost1Lanercost2Lanercost3Lanercost Priory was founded in 1169. It was home to a group of Augustinian canons. Augustinians were not monks exactly. Each was a canon, an ordained priest, and they were ruled by a prior. The priory was founded partly as a political act; both to establish a point of Anglo-Norman control and to help demarcate the newly re-established English Scottish frontier. In fact a reasonable portion of the stone used to build the priory was probably reclaimed from the nearby Hadrian’s Wall.

The priory was founded by Robert de Vaux. As well as political considerations de Vaux also probably wanted a site to endow perpetual prayers both for himself and for the souls of his parents. The priory was endowed with both churches and lands and it was both dedicated and founded in 1169. The original buildings would have been largely wood, but due to the proximity of Hadrian’s Wall…

View original post 332 more words

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Author Event – 12th December, East Bergholt

I had a number of people say that they were sorry to miss out on the launch event for Sheriff and Priest – so I thought I’d do it again!

This time the lovely people at Old Hall in East Bergholt will be hosting the event; put 12th December, 7:30 in your diary, and click through the link below to RSVP, so we know how many chairs to put out!

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/author-event-local-author-local-history-tickets-40147518308

Nicky.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

REVIEW – The Midnight Queen

This review first appeared on the Historical Novel Society’s website.

The Midnight Queen

By

I’m not at all sure that this is conventional historical fiction – I think it’ll live on my Science Fantasy shelves! However, the world is a fascinating and complex one; magic exists, through spoken spells in arcane languages. The Kingdom of Britain includes the Duchies of Normandie, Maine, and Breizh, and excludes Eire and Alba (Scotland); Henry XII sits on the throne. There is firm, widespread belief in a slew of ancient gods – I recognised both Greek and Celtic ones – who have real powers. There is a plot against the life of the King, whose only daughter has been spirited away as a baby. The heroine is a feisty protagonist, and her character arc takes her from country bumpkin, ignorant of her magic, to a powerful mage, in the end accepting that she is indeed a Princess, with all that entails. Along the way, she meets and falls in love with her wicked stepfather’s student, who turns out to be almost her match as a mage. He returns her love, whilst developing from a callow youth with a stutter, to being a man who can defend his wife’s honour against an attack from her father the King. There’s plenty of action to keep you turning pages, and the magic is a necessary (and very interesting) part.

Overall, I enjoyed this book – it was a quick, easy read; and it’s certainly something I could see my teenage daughters devouring whole. It’s the first in a trilogy, so plenty more to look forward to.

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

REVIEW – Empires of the Sun

This review first appeared on the Historical Novel Society’s website.

Empires in the Sun: The Struggle for the Mastery of Africa

By

Starting with the shelling of Algiers by a French battle fleet in 1830, Lawrence James paints a deep and nuanced picture of the relationship between Europe and Africa. The book is split into four parts: 1830-1881 covers the Arab legacy and the early colonial period; 1882-1918, the height of the European colonization; then 1919-1945, and the growing national movements; and finally, 1945-1990 and the end of the European colonies. The last piece of the puzzle, the birth of Mandela’s South Africa, took place in 1993.

I was born a colonial and grew up in Africa, and the continent has always drawn me. I found this book revelatory in its treatment of the early history: it fleshed out wonderfully what was taught in school in Kenya, and painted a vivid picture of events and people. I was equally impressed by the last section, the last 30 years or so of which I lived through; it was fascinating to see a multifaceted view of events. If you’re interested in the history of Africa, you’ll love this book.

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized