Shaping – the Why

Richard Stephenson Clarke is one of my Dodnash Books clients, who writes the most beautiful poetry; then works to find a shape that reflects the essence of the poetry. It’s such an unusual art form, and such a pleasure to explore! I knew I wanted to help produce Richard’s work as soon as I set eyes on it, and it’s great to hold the book in your hands. Contact me – or Richard – if you’d like a copy.

Richard Stephenson Clarke

When I wrote the first few pieces, I had no idea at all that I would be shaping any of them. Then one poem – which I was rearranging on the page, just to see how the lines could be best presented – began to form a very clear shape. This was the poem called Carvings, which happens to be about the mind working on things over time, quite unconsciously: forming, fashioning, sculpting, putting them away, hiding them from sight – and later rediscovering them. It seemed very appropriate that there was such a carved shape coming to light in the piece itself.

Having watched the first section fall into place, I wondered whether it would be possible to do this throughout the whole piece – and so began the climbing of Everest… I tried it on another piece, and another, and before long I just knew I wanted to…

View original post 169 more words

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Lambert Simnel and Edward V

This article, by Matt Lewis of Matt’s History Blog – well respected, and always a good read – is a classic example of why historical fiction is such an exciting area to write in.
Matt takes a close, well-informed look at the two rebellions by young boys in the reign of Henry Tudor, the usurper who killed Richard lll on the field of battle. Was either one – or both – the son of Edward V, the Princes in the Tower, supposedly killed by Shakespear’s caricature of nasty old hunchbacked Richard the Evil Uncle?
It’s possible. But 15thC records can be obscure, and Henry seems to have been quie thorough in his burning of all relevant records. A non-fiction book summarising all this would have an awful lot of gaps and speculation. Step forward, the historical fiction writer… Someone (not me, not my period) is going to have tremendous fun writing a novel or two about this. I wish them well, and look forward to it!

Matt's History Blog

This post turned into a way longer piece than I meant, so please bear with it!

When I wrote The Survival of the Princes in the Tower, I posited a theory, one of many alternatives offered. This particular idea has grown on me ever since, and I find myself unable to shake it off. I’m beginning to convince myself that the 1487 Lambert Simnel Affair was never an uprising in favour of Edward, Earl of Warwick, as history tells us. I think I’m certain I believe it was a revolt in support of Edward V, the elder of the Princes in the Tower. Sounds crazy? Just bear with me.

PitT-006-Hardback-Dust-Jacket-Bookshelf

Why do we think we know that the Yorkist uprising of 1487 favoured Edward, Earl of Warwick? In reality, it is simply because that was the official story of the Tudor government. It made the attempt a joke; a rebellion in…

View original post 5,280 more words

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Guest Post: ‘1215 and all that’ by Nicky Moxey, author of Sheriff and Priest

I thoroughly enjoyed writing this post! Thanks to Cathy for the opportunity.

What Cathy Read Next...

I’m delighted to welcome Nicky Moxey to What Cathy Read Next today.  A review copy of Nicky’s historical novel, Sheriff and Priest, is sitting in my author review pile.  Unfortunately, it may be there for some time so, in the meantime, I’m thrilled to bring you a guest post from Nicky about the turbulent events of King John’s reign.  It’s also an insight into her research for the sequel to Sheriff and Priest, due out in 2019.

Follow my blog with Bloglovin


Pageflex Persona [document: PRS0000032_00032]About the Book

Wimer could have become a monk. Instead, his decision to become a Chaplain – to make his way in the wider world of men – has put his soul in mortal danger.

In 12th Century East Anglia, poor Saxon boys stay poor. It takes an exceptional one to win Henry II’s friendship, and to rise to the job of High Sheriff of all Norfolk…

View original post 1,509 more words

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Updated cover :)

I just wanted to share this pretty new cover my lovely artist daughter has done for me, adding the awards that Wimer has won 🙂

Pageflex Persona [document: PRS0000032_00032]

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

The Giant’s Grave, Penrith, Cumbria

I have been distracted from the 12th Century recently by a visit to a Suffolk church – or rather, by the intriguing single large stone opposite it. The stone looks for all the world like a Viking or early Christian hogsback grave marker, and has very clearly been shaped. But there are no hogsback stones in this part of the UK; they are only to be found clustered in the Northwest and Scotland. So what is it? And what’s it doing here? – the stone is not native, it’s been imported. This lovely blog post was of great help in researching that liminal phase as the Vikings became good Christians, for the short story that demanded to be written.

The Journal Of Antiquities

OS grid reference: NY 5165 3016. A short walk in an easterly direction from market Square and king street (A6) in the centre of Penrith is the ancient church of St Andrew, a Saxon foundation. At the north-side of the church stands a slight mound on top of which are two pillar-crosses and four hogback gravestones – collectively known as the Giants Grave. These stones are said to have been placed over the burial site of Owain Caesarius, legendary and heroic king of Cumbria during the early 10th century, who was said to have been a giant of a man. Also in the churchyard is the Giant’s Thumb, a damaged Anglo-Norse wheel-headed cross dating from 920 AD.

The Giant’s Grave, Penrith.

The two tall and slender pillar-crosses standing 15 feet apart are now heavily worn and it is difficult to make out the carvings on them, but they have been dated to around 1000 AD and are Anglo-Norse in…

View original post 257 more words

Leave a comment

Filed under Archaeology, History

Papal Nuncios

The appointment of Papal legates (or Nuncios) in the early years of the 13thC makes fascinating reading.

I’m currently enjoying learning about Pandulf Verraccio, who was the legate who personally presented King John with his sentence of excommunication in 1211 – THAT must have been an interesting audience! He was also the man to whom King John surrendered his kingdom in 1213, and was also present at Runymede for the signing of the Magna Carta.

He appears to have had an on/off relationship with Pope Innocent, being recalled from office several times… In one of the down times, he was granted the Bishopric of Norwich, which brings him into contact with Dodnash Priory. How could a Roman bishop understand the subtleties of local practice? This quote from the 1188 Dodnash Priory charters is going to trip him up…

“Any dispute will be settled by the common council of the churches of the Aldergrove and Battle and the incumbent of East Bergholt, and if this should fail, by the arbitration of the Bishop of Norwich, without recourse to any superior judge.”

I feel a road trip to Battle coming up…

2 Comments

Filed under Uncategorized

To Lie for Truth’s Sake: The Novelist’s Conundrum

The best writing advice I’ve read for a long time!

A Writer's Path

by Richard Risemberg

The job of a fiction writer is to lie. Still, if it were only to lie, you could dedicate yourself to advertising or politics instead and accept troubled sleep as the price for prosperity. But a fiction writer must lie to show truth, and that’s not as easy as it sounds.

View original post 762 more words

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Book Quote Corner – Sheriff and Priest

I adore Norwich Cathedral. Does it show? 😀 But I’m sure Wimer did too.

A Writer's Path

View original post 153 more words

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Living a mediaeval mindset today

One of the things I most love about Gozo – that is, apart from the unbelievable archaeology, the unspoilt scenery, and the glorious weather (well, mostly!) – is the fact that the whole island is steeped in the Roman Catholic faith.

Now I personally am not a believer, but I have a great deal of respect for those who practice their faith; and here in Gozo I can talk to people who have had an unbroken religious practice since St Paul landed on the islands in 60AD.

That kind of experience simply isn’t possible in the UK, with our turbulent Tudor history, and it’s an absolute Godsend for someone who writes mediaeval historical fiction. Xaghra our lady of sorrows procession 2016 mk 2

Let me give you an example; flights from Stansted to Luqa get in about 9:30pm. I generally get a taxi from the airport to the Gozo ferry, in the (usually vain) hope that I catch the just-after-10 sailing and don’t have to sit around at the ferry terminal for another hour. (Top tip; do NOT attempt to drink the liquid that the “coffee machine” produces. <shudders>) This is also a great opportunity to catch up on island happenings. I always ask if there’s anything going on that I should go and see; imagine my delight this time when the taxi driver casually mentioned the Our Lady of Sorrows processions on the Friday before Holy Week.

Every church in the island was suddenly crowded with beautiful – and huge – statues; Jesus on a cross, the Virgin Mary in various interpretations. This one here is Xaghra’s wonderful Our Lady of Sorrows, and this is the 2016 procession – alas, this year’s was rained off. (I sat and listened to the Mass said partially in Latin instead, which I also enjoyed!)

But the bit that sticks in my mind most was when I popped into Xaghra’s main church earlier in the week to admire the statues. One of the men fixing banners to the wall asked if I was interested in the church, and I clearly made the right noises; I was treated to its history back to its founding in the 17thC, along with the part his family had played – including hiding some of the church’s treasures from Napoleon’s invading army. It was so clearly a central part of his life. Xaghra our lady of sorrows procession 2016 mk 1Then the mindblowing bit – he started to describe the procession; 700 official participants from a village whose population is around 5,000. Every family has at least a couple of members involved. From the looks of this photo – again from the 2016 procession – it looks to me like the whole village turned out to follow the statue!

I think that’s why I find it very easy to write about my 12thC Priory in Gozo; because, just as it was to my protagonists, faith is just a given in Gozitan life. I wonder if I could persuade the tax-man that my trips are an essential business expense 🙂

3 Comments

Filed under History

Snow cold

In case you missed it – the UK has had unusually snowy, cold weather this week.

My heating chose to show solidarity with my beloved Priory, and stop working! Brrr!

 Fire in snow
Image above by Jamesdlogan shared under creative commons license
https://www.flickr.com/photos/jdlogan/5152944175

 

Access to the Warming Room

One of the best pieces of writing advice I ever received is to incorporate your daily realities into your writing. The idea is, by contemplating a present object or experience, to sieze the depth of information available first-hand to put rich details into your depiction of the past. We were talking abut a Roman brooch I’d found, that ended up pinning Henry ll’s cloak together when he was knighted; this week I’ve had the opportunity to observe an entirely different issue when my gas central heating stopped working in the coldest weather the UK has had for some time. Luckily, I had backup electric radiators – until there was a power cut…
The year 1204/5 was one of those epic years when it was so cold that the Thames froze. Stored crops spoiled; fishponds were solid. To add insult to misery, King John called in all coinage in order to issue new money, so it wasn’t even possible to buy food at the market.
My monks were better off than most – but also had a burden that lay people didn’t share. The Rule of St Benedict stated that only three rooms in the Priory could have a fire; the infirmary, the kitchen, and the warming-room, and access to the last was to be as sparing as possible.
I have been writing scenes around this period with far more realism and insight than I bargained for – and am very much appreciating my visits to friends’ warm rooms, and hot suppers! I have a heating engineer booked. I can’t imagine how awful it must have been to have unrelenting bleakness!

Leave a comment

Filed under History, Jean