Mediocre Failures

moxeyns:

This is a superb response to the “Pass SATS or you’re a failure” Conservative policy announced today. Every child Matters, right? This paragraph sums it up for me:
“Perhaps most importantly, we could offer kids like mine what their primary school has offered them already : care, compassion; an opportunity to shine at non-academic activities like swimming, or telling stories, or singing; a safe place where dedicated adults try to find what they’re good at (even if they’re not actually that good at it) and nurture those abilities and interests. Rather than saying “Look, kid, you’re 11 now, so jump through this specific hoop, or you’re a failure”, we might see it as our duty to try and offer at least a range of different approaches to education which allow all children to get something valuable out of their last half-decade of schooling.”

Originally posted on Disappointed Idealist:

My children are adopted. They were adopted at the ages of three, four and six. As with nearly all children adopted in this country over the last couple of decades, this means that their early life experiences were pretty terrible. As each was born, their collective experience of life became more damaging, as their circumstances worsened. So the eldest is least affected as her first years were perhaps less difficult experiences, while the youngest is most affected, as her entire first two years of life were appalling. I’m not going to go into detail here about their specific early life experiences, but if you want to read up on the sort of effects which can result from serious neglect or abuse, then you could read this .

Why am I writing this ? Especially now after midnight in the middle of the Easter holidays ? It’s because I’m so angry I…

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Oliver Rackham

“It was hard to penetrate any room in his house because of the piles of books and specimens.”

That’s the kind of obituary I’d like – Oliver Rackham was a true scholar; ecologist, biologist, archaeologist – and with the authorial skill to put across the wonderful synthesis of ideas he came up with.

I never met the man, but I own many of his books, and I’m sad he’s not around to write more.

Oliver Rackham; thank you; rest in peace.

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I wanted to be a writer when I grew up…

A guest article I wrote on the subject: http://www.withoutbooks.com/when-asked-im-proud-to-say-im-a-writer/ My friend Amy Burns Heffernan has a fascinating and growing blog on all things writerly, with a good sprinkling of guest posts, at her blog “Without books… life would be dull!” – I love her concept, and am proud to be asked to contribute.   Nicky.

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Goodreads giveaway – Henry and the Magic Pencil Book 1

To celebrate the release of Book 2, I have a signed copy of Henry and the Magic Pencil Book 1 up for grabs on Goodreads.

https://www.goodreads.com/giveaway/show/121321-henry-and-the-magic-pencil

Limited time offer, put your name in the hat today! Or if you can’t wait, all the stories are on Amazon.

HBFrontcover_v004

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Writing Henry – getting the covers spot-on!

It occurred to me that people might be interested in the process I use to write these childrens’ stories, which are very different to writing either stories or novels for adults. In the first of this mini-series, I introduced you to Henry. The second talked about the inspiration for the stories. The third discussed story structure, and some of the mechanics of getting the stories to work. In this last post in the series, my daughter – a professional artist, who does all the covers – talks about her process.

Fi11Nov2014Fi says:

“My mum is the best client ever. This, however you may beg to differ, is not bias. It’s not because she’ll still love me if I miss deadlines (my services come with a certain amount of inbuilt procrastination) or because the content is easily achievable (it varies, and I’m never against dinosaur reference researching when unaccountably she doesn’t have a full topical lecture prepared with slides) but because she knows what she wants.
  This simple aspect derived from her process of storytelling, means that when she skypes me, or we’re face to face (either at home or on rare and happy occasions beer festivals) I get a clear understanding almost straight away of what is needed from the image and how it fits in around the other covers she wants from me. I am completely spoiled. It’s wonderful.
  Take one of the latest books for example (check them all out, they’re awesome *shameless plugging*). We sit down. I sip my mead, then open my sketchbook and grab my trusty black biro. ‘I want a Viking’ she says ‘a proper one, without the horned helmet. Did you know that there’s no evidence of them wearing them? Depictions around the 8th to 11th centuries had them bare headed or with simple helmets.’ This continues for a little while, ‘he needs to look confused please, as well.’ During this dialogue I am happily sketching away, I like vikings. They remind me visually of Tolkein’s dwarves and I’m drawing an expansive beard and a comically confused expression. Even, after 5 minutes of Viking hat history, adding a helmet because after receiving all that new information. Yes, he will have one. Without the horns.
  From this meeting it becomes fairly straight forward, she’s approved my preliminary sketches of this character, we have been over two other book covers in the same session. I’ve justified my composition choices and we’ve oohed and ahhed over what the primary background color should be (the books are sold in threes so some visual tying together is nice). I go home, rosey, and sit down before my computer and my graphics tablet.
  My first job is to upload my preliminary sketch to the computer, I do usually like to get a rough one down first using pen and paper. It feels a lot easier to me, in a digital format mistakes are too easy to undo, this takes away from the end quality which keeps a lot of its original charm from those first imperfections.
  I settle into photoshop now, drawing over the sketch on different layers. The colours are blocked in and the hair layer kept separate from the clothes layer, for example. Once these first steps are done I add in the agreed background colour, this might be the first time I use the primary brush of these covers. A chalk brush gives a great amount of texture, I like the soft effect that can be achieved.
  Shading is completed throughout the picture, then the colours adjusted so they look good next to each other and as a whole. At this point the original sketch has vanished, so I dig it up again and make sure I haven’t strayed too far.
  I add the familiar ‘Henry Baker’ to the bottom then Skype my mum. At this point in the process the image is usually (in my mind, unless I’m stuck and actively looking for guidance) 75% done. She has been known at this point to declare them finished and grab them for final text addage. I find this slightly stressful. I’m looking for feedback and changes! But the customer is, in this case, right as she is happy. I then simply save the image as a jpeg in the highest quality setting and sit back. Trying really very hard to not look too closely at the picture again, the urge to tweak is deadly and ever looming.
Onto the next cover. “
See why I love my darling daughter so much, not only for her sweet self, but as a co-creator? She listens to my random history outbursts without compaining! (much.). She takes my ramblings and draws EXACTLY what I wanted, much, much better than anything I had in my head. She puts up with me nagging her at increasingly frantic intervals, as my arbitrary self-imposed publication deadlines approach. And she still comes home to visit :D

The first three Henry stories have been available for some time, either as a bundled paperback, or as individual electronic stories. The next three have just been released, with three more planned early in 2015.

The stories are:

Book 1

Henry and the Necklace – In which Henry meets a surprisingly large elephant.

Henry and the Magic Teapot – Henry tries to give his Nan a present – but she is not happy with the results!

Henry and the Football Boots – Henry has to choose between being brilliant at football, or hurting his friend.

Book 2

Henry and the Viking – a trip to the museum has some interesting consequences.

Henry and the Dinosaur – Henry’s brother Mike creates a big problem!

Henry and the Bird Bath – Henry swears never to try karate again…

They are all on my Amazon page: UK and US

As a bonus, I’m recording Henry and the Football Boots, and will be giving that recording away.

Sign up for my newsletter: http://eepurl.com/9xPxv

Connect with me online:

Twitter: http://twitter.com/moxeyns

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/nicky.moxey (Nicky)

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Henry-and-the-Magic-Pencil/542341045784909 (Henry)

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Writing Henry – getting the words right.

It occurred to me that people might be interested in the process I use to write these childrens’ stories, which are very different to writing either stories or novels for adults. In the first of this mini-series, I introduced you to Henry. The second talked about the inspiration for the stories. Now I’d like to talk about getting the structure and mechanics of the story right.

I know the bones, by now; the story needs to be somewhere around the 3,000 word mark, with a reasonably classic story arc – set-up; crisis; committment; mid-point; action; result; close-down. Generally, I’ll want a scene break or two in there at or around some of those points, so I can skip boring bits of time and move the action on. However, there is one huge, looming problem, that I have to bear in mind right at the start.

These stories are aimed at an independent but not very confident reader. Ideally, I’d like to stick to the frequently-used word list for the UK Key Stage 2 – readers up to age 10. However, this list is appallingly short and narrow in scope. I don’t think either “football” or “boots” are on it, from memory – let alone “elephant”! So, I have to keep the words to ones that can be easily sounded out, or worked out from context.

However, I refuse to dumb down the story!

So, the process generally goes;

– write the first draft, often on paper, getting the feel for the story. (Start talking to my elder daughter about the art work. She’s a brilliant artist, and I love what she’s done / is doing with the Henry covers.)

– Typed up into Word, and edited for structure.viking wordle

– edited for story flow.

– put into wordle and edited for word overuse. Wordle is a seriously useful tool!

– read out loud – for story flow and rythm.

– Given to my younger daughter to read, as lead beta reader – she’s severely dyslexic; if she can cope – and enjoys the story – it’s on the right lines. Pass the story out to other beta readers. Give Elder Daughter a deadline date for the artwork.

– Final edit & polish.

– Fight my way through the compiling jungle, and publish the story as an e-book and as part of a paperwork bundle.

I remembered to look at the stats that Word gives me, when I’d finished Henry and the Viking – apparently I took 10,111 minutes to write it! I feel a bit binary about that :D But that’s not far off, I guess; 160 hours or so, 20 working days, call it about 3 months elapsed time given that I write these on a very part-time basis, hours stolen from the day job and my historical novels.

The first three Henry stories have been available for some time, either as a bundled paperback, or as individual electronic stories. The next three are due for imminent release, with three more planned early in 2015.

The stories are:

Book 1

Henry and the Necklace – In which Henry meets a surprisingly large elephant.

Henry and the Magic Teapot – Henry tries to give his Nan a present – but she is not happy with the results!

Henry and the Football Boots – Henry has to choose between being brilliant at football, or hurting his friend.

Book 2

Henry and the Viking – a trip to the museum has some interesting consequences.

Henry and the Dinosaur – Henry’s brother Mike creates a big problem!

Henry and the Bird Bath – Henry swears never to try karate again…

They are all on my Amazon page: UK and US

As a bonus, I’m recording Henry and the Football Boots, and will be giving that away during the next release.

Sign up for my newsletter: http://eepurl.com/9xPxv

Connect with me online:

Twitter: http://twitter.com/moxeyns

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/nicky.moxey (Nicky)

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Henry-and-the-Magic-Pencil/542341045784909 (Henry)

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Writing Henry – where the stories come from

It occurred to me that people might be interested in the process I use to write these childrens’ stories, which are very different to writing either stories or novels for adults. In the first of this mini-series, I introduced you to Henry. Now I’d like to talk about where the stories come from.

The inspiration for them comes from many sources.

Football Boots was the result of overhearing a conversation between two boys on a train; they were clearly deadly sporting rivals, but were being very gentlemanly about it. I liked that their friendship took first place.

The Necklace in question was a gift from one of my daughters. It stands about a centimetre high, made of some ebony-black South East Asian wood, bound in silver chains. It looks very real. I live in a rural village, with horses up and down my road all the time, often leaving behind free manure. The thought of the pile of poo an elephant would leave – and one of my neighbours leaping on it, for their roses – was the clinching image…

I’m not sure where the idea for either the Teapot or the Dinosaur came from. Those stories just emerged fully formed! I do have a Brown Betty teapot, just the shape and colour of the one in the story, though.

The Bird Bath evolved from my own love of karate. I’ve been doing it for quite a few years now, and am becoming vaguely competent, at least – but I also love watching the joy that youngsters take from doing the flashy stuff! I have, embarrassingly, messed up a kick just like Henry did, luckily with no bad consequences!

I was lucky enough to see the Viking exhibition at the British Museum in London over the summer. I knew I wanted to write about a Viking artefact; but initially, it was the tiny Valkyrie statue that caught my imagination. No story was coming, though – usually a sign that I’m barking up the wrong tree! I went Googling for her picture, to try and kick-start her imagination, with a rubbish search term – just “Viking artefact”. From the page of images, two leapt out at me – and I knew I had both the item in my story that Henry draws, and the Viking who had to be in it too.
0a06c-vikingfigureheadsnorri

The first three Henry stories have been available for some time, either as a bundled paperback, or as individual electronic stories. The next three are due for imminent release, with three more planned early in 2015.

The stories are:
Book 1
Henry and the Necklace – In which Henry meets a surprisingly large elephant.
Henry and the Magic Teapot – Henry tries to give his Nan a present – but she is not happy with the results!
Henry and the Football Boots – Henry has to choose between being brilliant at football, or hurting his friend.
Book 2
Henry and the Viking – a trip to the museum has some interesting consequences.
Henry and the Dinosaur – Henry’s brother Mike creates a big problem!
Henry and the Bird Bath – Henry swears never to try karate again…
They are all on my Amazon page: UK and US

As a bonus, I’m recording Henry and the Football Boots, and will be giving that away during the next release.
Sign up for my newsletter: http://eepurl.com/9xPxv
Connect with me online:
Twitter: http://twitter.com/moxeyns
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/nicky.moxey (Nicky)
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Henry-and-the-Magic-Pencil/542341045784909 (Henry)

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Writing Henry – a bit about him

It occurred to me that people might be interested in the process I use to write these childrens’ stories, which are very different to writing either stories or novels for adults. First, I’d like to introduce you to Henry!
In my head Henry’s a slightly scruffy small boy, maybe 8 or 9, living in a very ordinary house in a small town in England. His family – mother, father, older brother, and grandmother – is very important to him, as are his school friends. Henry’s not at the top of the class, but he’s not thick either; he bumbles along somewhere in the middle of things, trying his best, and generally getting on quite well with the world.
He might be one of these lads…

Credit: joebackward on Flickr, under a Creative Commons license

Credit: joebackward on Flickr, under a Creative Commons license

The person I’m writing for is someone who’s not a very confident reader, who’s not into the high drama of, say, the Northern Lights, and would never have the courage to pick up something as thick as a Harry Potter book. This person wants something close to home, something they can relate to, and something that’s not too long!

Alternatively, the books appeal to a wider audience as bedtime stories. At around the 3,000 word mark, they’re an appealing length, delivering a complete story in a reasonable time; or the reader can choose to stop at break points. Each story has at least a couple.

The first three Henry stories have been available for some time, either as a bundled paperback, or as individual electronic stories. The next three are due for imminent release, with three more planned early in 2015.

The stories are:
Book 1
Henry and the Necklace – In which Henry meets a surprisingly large elephant.
Henry and the Magic Teapot – Henry tries to give his Nan a present – but she is not happy with the results!
Henry and the Football Boots – Henry has to choose between being brilliant at football, or hurting his friend.
Book 2
Henry and the Viking – a trip to the museum has some interesting consequences.
Henry and the Dinosaur – Henry’s brother Mike creates a big problem!
Henry and the Bird Bath – Henry swears never to try karate again…
They are all on my Amazon page: UK and US

As a bonus, I’m recording Henry and the Football Boots, and will be giving that away during the next release.
Sign up for my newsletter: http://eepurl.com/9xPxv
Connect with me online:
Twitter: http://twitter.com/moxeyns
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/nicky.moxey (Nicky)
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Henry-and-the-Magic-Pencil/542341045784909 (Henry)

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The Feast of the Epiphany, 1182

2014-ChristmasPartyBlogHop Apologies – you need this link! http://nickymoxey.com/2014/12/19/the-feast-of-the-epiphany-1182/

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The Feast of the Epiphany, 1182

2014-ChristmasPartyBlogHopThe Christmas Season (whatever your belief or religion)
is the time for merry-making and parties…
So come and join some wonderful authors (and their characters)

for an Online Virtual Party!

Browse through a variety of Blogs (hopping forward to the next one on the list)
for a veritable feast of entertainment!
(And just as with any good party, you’ll find
a few giveaway prizes along the way!)

The following is a scene from my forthcoming book, Wimer the Chaplain, in which Henry ll dispenses his own brand of Christmas cheer…

Henry drained his mead cup, and leant back in his throne, belching gently. Ah – good stuff! He rubbed his full stomach. How pleasant it is not to be at loggerheads with either my sons, or the Church. I must be slipping. He looked round the crowded hall for those of his children present at this feast – a task made more difficult as many of the diners grew sated, and moved around to chat to old friends seated in different parts of the hall.

Easy to spot was his one legitimate son; John was still eating, hunched over his trencher, clad in a fine lambswool tunic. On closer inspection, there was a dark stain on his sleeve, which was shorter than it should be. Henry shook his head. The boy was going through a period of growth, making him even more morose than usual, and clumsy as a puppy. Please God it be over soon.

Also still seated, a few places further than John, was his acknowledged natural son, Geoffrey, whom Henry had recently elevated to Chancellor. He too had pushed back from the table, and, goblet in hand, was surveying the room. Of all my children, he is the one who can be most trusted, and the only one who consistently uses his intellect to my advantage. What a shame he can’t inherit! But he is a magnificent servant, and will continue to serve his brothers. Henry smiled proudly, and looked again for the least of his sons.

It’s a shame that none of the girls are here – it would have been good to have them, and their children, as playmates for young William. Henry spotted the boy in a corner, teasing a wolfhound pup with a bone. He’s taller than I remembered – he must be, what, five? Perhaps six? Definitely time to take him from his mother and get him some decent tutoring. He was very like Ida in colouring. She was rarely far from him – yes, there she is, leaning against the table, watching the boy. Looking a little careworn. This, too, is in my service – she has been at my side whenever I’ve beckoned for many years now. I should make some better provision for her…

The thought of losing one mistress brought his Rosamund to mind. He was going to make another gift to Godstow Nunnery when he distributed presents shortly. He urgently wanted to arrange the best possible provision for her, body and soul, and to minimise her time in Purgatory with prayers around the clock. There was the Abbess – hah! With young Roger Bigod sandwiched between her and the Abbot of Stratford Abbey, a Godly man indeed, but a crashing bore; and to be another recipient of Henry’s generosity later.

Bigod looked as though he was bearing up well to the double onslaught of piety. No, be fair – he was making himself useful whilst waiting on Henry’s pleasure for his inheritance, witnessing charter after charter. In fact, he could witness the charters to the two religious houses. He is at least easier to spend time around than his father had been, and possibly more honourable too. Not that he was going to get his Earldom back, nor indeed the bulk of his lands, until Henry was a lot surer of him. Perhaps he was owed something on account, though…

Henry slapped his slight but growing paunch, and leapt to his feet. He used the momentum to swing up onto the table and over to the other side. Not bad for a man past the best flush of youth, my lad! The noise level dropped gratifyingly fast, and soon even the servitors were still, having topped up everyone’s drinks.

“My friends! We come to the end of another Christmas, and another year. And what a year it has been! We are at peace; reconciled with our Scottish and Welsh neighbours, and with Philip the new King of France. My son Henry the Young King is even now supporting Philip, and though we miss him greatly, it is an honourable task. My sons Richard and Geoffrey are firmly in control of their realms; my daughters all contributing towards the succession of their husbands.
I am blessed with three sons here with me tonight, and am surrounded by my friends. I would like to share some of these blessings, and distribute some gifts, as is my custom.”

He beckoned over the servitor with his small chest, and put it on the table.
“I start with the Church, as is proper.”
He took two charters from the chest, opened one, and laid the other on the table.
“Would the Abbess of Godstow please come here?”
The elderly nun bumbled up, and curtsied twice in front of the King. Henry bowed low, and handed her the charter with a smile.
“The lands, as promised, good Abbess. “
“We will pray for her, Sire.” she whispered.
Henry nodded formal acknowledgement, then returned to his task, a little subdued.
“The Abbot of Stratford!” The Abbot accepted his charter gratefully.

“And now, my beloved son John.”
John stood, a trifle unsteadily. Henry realised that he’d taken a little too much wine, and moved down the table towards him, rather than embarrass the boy. He turned back to the room.
“I thought long and hard about a gift for John. I rejected clothes; because he’s growing so fast that he’d need a new set next week.”
There was a ripple of amusement, and John blushed.
“I’d give him money; but he’d only ask for more. I’ve raised sons his age before.”
This time there was some outright laughter.
“Instead, I wanted to give him something to connect him to his heritage.”
He stripped off a ring from the middle finger on his right hand, and held it up to the crowd. The large emerald caught the light nicely.
“This ring belonged to my father, and to his father before him. I think John has grown into it now.”
He turned to his son, and slipped it on his finger.
“Wear it in good health!”
John bowed, looking a little underawed. Henry shook his head slightly, and went back to the chest.

“For my beloved Chancellor; a Book of Hours! Having just missed out on the Bishopric of Lincoln, he will need to sharpen his praying skills for his next attempt at the cloth…”
He lifted out a gorgeous book, wrapped in purple silk. Geoffrey took it reverently in both hands, and unwrapped it to reveal a gold and jewelled frontispiece.
“Sire! This is magnificent! My profound thanks!”

“And for my youngest son, William…”
William needed beckoning forward, this being the first time that Henry had singled him out in public. He watched with pride as the boy strode forward, carefully put out a foot, and bowed low.
“How old are you now, boy?”
“I am six, Sire.”
“High time you had one of these, then.”
Henry handed him a short dagger, snug in its own tooled leather sheath and belt. The boy crowed in delight, and strapped it on instantly. He looked round to show his mother. Henry followed his gaze, and bent to whisper to the boy,
“Go and fetch her.”

He ran across, and pulled her over; she arrived in front of Henry laughing and protesting, then dropped into a deep curtsey. He put a finger under her chin, and lifted her up.
“Not forgetting William’s mother, the Lady Ida; a length of that very expensive silk she loves so much.”
She blushed prettily, and curtsied again. Henry looked around for Roger.
“Stay here, my dear; Roger Bigod, step up, please.”

He waited until Roger had bowed and taken a place beside Ida.
“I am not yet ready to pass judgement on your stepbrothers’ claim to your father’s lands and title; but in recognition of your services these last few years, I am returning to you the manors of Acle, Halvergate and South Walsham.”
Roger bowed again, looking suitably grateful.
“And one other gift, greater than you know. The hand of the Lady Ida de Tosny, Royal ward, in marriage.”

There. A neat discharge of my obligations.

“Raise your cups, my friends! To Christmas cheer!”

Thank you for joining our party

now follow on to the next enjoyable entertainment…

  1. Helen Hollick : “You are Cordially Invited to aBall”(plus a giveaway prize) –  http://tinyurl.com/nsodv78
  2. Alison Morton :“Saturnalia surprise – a winter party tale” (plus a giveaway prize) – http://tinyurl.com/op8fz57
  3. Andrea Zuvich : No Christmas For You! The Holiday Under Cromwell – http://tinyurl.com/pb9fh3m
  4. Ann Swinfen : Christmas 1586 – Burbage’s Company of Players Celebrates – http://tinyurl.com/mwaukkx
  5. Anna Belfrage : All I want for Christmas (plus a giveaway prize) – http://tinyurl.com/okycz3o
  6. Carol Cooper : How To Be A Party Animal – http://wp.me/p3uiuG-Mn
  7. Clare Flynn :  A German American Christmas – http://tinyurl.com/mmbxh3r
  8. Debbie Young :  Good Christmas Housekeeping (plus a giveaway prize) – http://tinyurl.com/mbnlmy2
  9. Derek Birks :  The Lord of Misrule – A Medieval Christmas Recipe for Trouble – http://wp.me/p3hedh-3f
  10. Edward James : An Accidental Virginand An Uninvited Guest – http://tinyurl.com/o3vowum and – http://tinyurl.com/lwvrxnx 
  11. Fenella J. Miller : Christmas on the Home front(plus a giveaway prize) – http://fenellamiller.blogspot.co.uk/2014/12/christmas-on-home-front-and-giveaway.html
  12. J. L. Oakley :  Christmas Time in the Mountains 1907(plus a giveaway prize) –  http://bit.ly/1v3uRYy
  13. Jude Knight : Christmas at Avery Hall in the Year of Our Lord 1804 – http://wp.me/p58yDd-az
  14. Julian Stockwin: Join the Party – http://tinyurl.com/n8xk946
  15. Juliet Greenwood : Christmas 1914 on the Home Front(plus a giveaway) – http://julietgreenwoodauthor.wordpress.com/2014/12/19/christmas-1914-on-the-home-front/
  16. Lauren Johnson :  Farewell Advent, Christmas is come” – Early Tudor Festive Feasts – http://wp.me/p1aZWT-ei
  17. Lindsay Downs : O Christmas Tree, O Christmas Tree – ​http://lindsaydowns-romanceauthor.weebly.com/
  18. Lucienne Boyce : A Victory Celebration – http://tinyurl.com/ovl4sus
  19. Nancy Bilyeau :  Christmas After the Priory(plus a giveaway prize) – http://tinyurl.com/p52q7gl
  20. Nicola Moxey : The Feast of the Epiphany, 1182 – http://tinyurl.com/pewcu6f
  21. Peter St John :  Dummy’s Birthday – http://tinyurl.com/nsqedvv
  22. Regina Jeffers : Celebrating a Regency Christmas (plus a giveaway prize) – http://tinyurl.com/pt2yvzs
  23. Richard Abbott : The Hunt – Feasting at Ugarit – http://bit.ly/1wSK2b5
  24. Saralee Etter : Christmas Pudding — Part of the Christmas Feast – http://tinyurl.com/lyd4d7b
  25. Stephen Oram : Living in your dystopia: you need a festival of enhancement…(plus a giveaway prize) – http://wp.me/p4lRC7-aG
  26. Suzanne Adair :The British Legion Parties Down for Yule 1780 (plus a giveaway prize)  http://bit.ly/1r9qnUZ


Thank you for joining us 

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