When the lights went out…

Tonight I spent the best part of an hour in the dark, except for one lighted candle, thinking about what the First World War would have meant to my relatives alive at the time. They lived such different lives…

For my maternal great-grandfather, WW1 would have been much less important than the fires of revolution brewing in Russia. He died on 25th October 1917, defending the Winter Palace in St Petersberg in the first wave of the Russian Revolution. Ironically, his cousin the Emperor was away reviewing troops… his daughter, my Grandmother, was looking after my Grandfather, who had a heart condition, on their country estate, escaping both the war and the Revolution. It wasn’t until 1925 that the revolutionaries worked down the list of aristocrats far enough to get to my Grandmother – Grandfather had died, leaving 5 children under the age of 6 – thus shifting us all to the UK.

For my paternal Grandmother, the war brought liberation, from her small-town Irish country origins. She ended up in the major children’s hospital in London, as Matron – and then had to go back home after the war. She must have been stifled ten-fold, because my father – illegitimate – was born just a few years later; she was literally thrown out of the Catholic household into the snow, pregnant, without a coat. I am proud to wear the ring she bought herself on my wedding-ring finger; she described it as her “get lost!” ring, to scare away unwanted suitors : )

I also spent a lot of time thinking about the Israeli/Palestinian conflict raging at the moment, and mourning the lives lost of the innocents involved. At least the boys and men killed in WW1 signed up for it, however futile their deaths; but the children killed as they slept in schools this week were pure collateral damage. Appalling. Perhaps we haven’t moved on very much at all.

—————————————————————————————————————–

I hope you enjoy my books as much as I loved writing them! Here’s my Amazon page.

If you’d like to know more about my writing, you can sign up for my newsletter.

Advertisements

4 Comments

Filed under History

4 responses to “When the lights went out…

  1. I had no idea you had a blog Nicky. You must have told me but the little grey memory cells are getting weaker…now to find the hours – you’ve written so much. And such fascinating ancestry. Nor did I realise Wimer was published. Cheers, Alan

    Like

    • Ah, revenge, Alan – I’m way behind in reading your blog 🙂 Wimer isn’t published, yet. I’ve just got some very useful comments back from an editor, and am revising the book in the light of them.

      Like

      • You’ll be further behind now. I’ve just posted Heraklion, Knossos will be posted tomorrow. I looked at smashwords (was it I who mentioned it to you? I usedf it for my e-book) but I’m a little venerable for the books you’ve published so far. Will Wimer be anything similar to Cadfael?

        Like

  2. It’s more an autobiography than a whodunit. Saxon boy makes good in a Norman world; still doesn’t belong; finds peace in a Priory…

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s